Nothing But Respect For MY Photographer

This is something I’ve been wanting to communicate to the public for a while. I want to thank my friends at the Hub, especially Shannon, for giving me a media in which this message can be spread to the masses. There is a level of professionalism and etiquette needed between models and photographers, and there is a kink in the chain. A lot of people have written pieces on how photographers should treat models, but I’m here to spread a different message. Models, we need to up our game. Not aesthetically, y’all are really killing it, but in the way we treat photographers and videographers. So here are 5 simple rules you can follow to not be a jerk.

  1. DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT re-edit photos sent to you without permission.

This seems self explanatory. Photographers know their craft, and this is their art. You are the focus of the shot, not the artist. You still play a very important role, but at the end of the day the photographer is featuring you in their art piece. There are very few exceptions to this. Unless you have paid the person a couple hundred and genuinely hate the photos sent to you, I would keep quiet. And if you feel an undying need to say something, please do it nicely. And respect a No. ****THIS INCLUDES CROPPING****

  1. If you are contacting a photographer and they send you rates don’t be offended.

Photographers are doing this for a job, not for fun. This is their career. They don’t owe you anything. They don’t need to offer you a TFP shoot. If them sending you their standard rates offends you, you might not want to pursue modeling. Not everyone is going to shoot you for free and that’s okay. It doesn’t mean you’re ugly. It doesn’t mean they don’t want to work with you. All it means is that this is their job. They need to pay rent too. Don’t give them attitude. Don’t unfollow them for it. And don’t act like a brat. If it is out of your price range, politely thank them for their time and move along.

  1. If a photographer redirects your posing during the shoot, take the direction.

The person behind the camera is in charge of the shot. If they want you to move your hand away from your face, please just do it. Trust your partner in the creative process. It’s always fine to be creative, and photographers that are too controlling can feel smothering, but I think posing needs to be a balance of effort that mostly relies on the model who is listening to the photographer for feedback.

  1. TAKE YOUR HAIR TIES OFF YOUR WRISTS!!!

Seriously, just do it. Be on top of your bodies. Try to avoid getting bruised up, don’t get hickies (like, really, don’t), and take care of your skin and hair. Your skin and body is going to be in focus so try to your best abilities to have it be camera ready. This will take so much work out of your photographer’s job. Don’t make anyone edit out your hickies.

  1.  Have fun!

Be yourself. Out of all of the things photographers put up with, a model who sits on her phone the whole time and doesn’t interact or get to know their photographers is one of the worst. Be friendly, inviting, and have a good time with the shoot. It makes things better for everyone, and it’s much easier to calm down a very excited model than to try and spice up a very boring one.  Always thank them, if they are doing trade please consider buying them lunch or coffee. Be humble and appreciative. Maybe try and even make a new friend. Some of the photographers I have shot with have become my very best friends and together we have been able to create some amazing art and memories. Art and Mem’s, thats all I really want out of this life anyway. What about you?

Love you all,

Lex

@Wanderrlex

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